Join us for Training 2020!Apply Now

Working with children, teens, and families has taught me many impactful lessons throughout my years of practice. One lesson that rings true for me more than ever is: parenting is not for the faint of heart, but the strong and courageous. They say it is the hardest job in the world, and after being a parent for 6 months so far, I must agree. I anticipated the physical and emotional demands of caring for the needs of a newborn, but what I didn’t expect was coming to terms with my own neediness while simultaneously tending to the needs of a completely dependent child.

Parenting is not for the faint of heart, but the strong and courageous.

What does it mean to be strong and courageous? Our society may say it is to be in control, self-reliant, unafraid and without needs. I don’t know about you, but when I attempt this route, it often does not end well. The more I try to do things on my own, the more I end up hurting myself and those I love. The parents that I see who are strong and courageous are the ones acutely aware of their powerlessness and who have the courage to ask for help.

Parenthood illuminates our powerlessness, as well as our neediness for God and others. It is easy to see that we are out of control in everything from blow-out diapers at the least convenient times, to our old habits, addictions, and struggles rearing their ugly heads…from reliving pain from our past, to experiencing new and challenging dynamics in our current relationships.  When we try to control and manage this whirlwind of changes and challenges, it leads to frustration, anxiety, and hopelessness.

Parenthood illuminates our powerlessness, as well as our neediness for God and others.

Thankfully, we don’t have to do this alone. To know that we are powerless is to know healthy shame, which says we are not God. Our dependence on a Higher Power is the only way to find our footing on this new path. We can have courage of heart, while also admitting to our neediness and powerlessness. May we be like the newborn — fully dependent on one who is much stronger, wiser, kinder, and loving so that we may live and thrive.

We can have courage of heart, while also admitting to our neediness and powerlessness.

 

You don’t have to go through parenting alone. Sage Hill is here to help.
Call us at 615-499-5453

 


Ingrid Ransom has called Nashville home since 2005 when she moved to study music business at Belmont University. However, while at Belmont she found herself drawn to social work and counseling after many mission trips spent working with orphans and survivors of human trafficking. After earning a Master’s Degree in Social Work from the University of Tennessee & before joining Sage Hill, Ingrid worked in Williamson and Davidson County schools as a mental health counselor.